MC: Knight: Book One – an interview with the author, L. Ann Marie

Natashia Thewes

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

I don’t read the genre I write in. I’m a horror, sci-fyish reader. King and Rice are favorites.

 

How did you get into writing?

I needed a job. At the time, I was a graphic designer for an ad agency. My bosses were crazy. Stories filling my head kept me busy while doing the mind numbing political propaganda art. I started writing the stories down and published them on Smashwords. Once I started, I couldn’t stop. I fell in love with the process, characters and job. And it is a job now.

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

IT, Angela’s Ashes and Queen of the Damned

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

The news. My books are about people working together for a greater good. Overcoming horrific situations to make it to happy, then turn around and put their hands out for the person behind them. Whether it’s domestic abuse, homelessness or PTSD. We all have something; we all need a hand. The news shows us every day that there is a need. In my stories, I supply the hand.

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

I have written 25 books. Most take a month to a month and a half. The characters and stories connect making background easy.

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

The characters play in my head. I write until they stop. No rituals, no outlines.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

Very, that’s how I started. I was picked up by a publisher very early on, but they have since closed. I don’t know the ‘how’ to market so other people have that job.

 

Do you read your book reviews?

Yes. When I first started, I would write down their points like it was advice. Now I like them in Amazon, about once a month, for the rating.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

Keep writing. Always move forward and accept help if it’s offered.

 

What are you reading now?

Mr. Mercedes by King

 

What’s your next step?

I’m finishing the Protectors Series and have a character that is trying to get some attention. I think I’ll give it to him. A new place, new characters to work with and new job to explore sounds fun.

 

 

I’m Not Dead – an interview with the author, William A Thau

Natashia Thewes

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

As an attorney in a 700 lawyer firm, I represented many high profile clients, including the Dallas Cowboys. I also represented the first Savings and Loan crook sentenced to Federal prison, and spent days being interviewed by Federal prosecutors and the FBI.

How did you get into writing?

I was head of fifty lawyers who represented banks and savings and loans in 1990, all of whom (everyone) went into receivership – almost 200. A counselor suggested I write a book about it to help me out of my depression. I wrote Non-Recourse, a thriller novel.

What are your top 3 books of all time?

Paradise by Judith McNaught, The Sandler Inquiry and The Eye of the Needle by Ken Follet.

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

It just came to me – implausible as it may initially seem, it’s based entirely on real fact.

How long did it take you to write this book?

One and a half years.

Have you got any writing rituals?

No

How important is marketing and social media for you?

I don’t know. I’ve tried a number of publicists and self-promotions with little success.

Do you read your book reviews?

Yes. There aren’t many.

What advice would you have for other writers?

Write for your own pleasure, not with the expectation of becoming a best-selling author.

What are you reading now?

Nothing.

The Five Roads: Part 1 – an interview with the author C. F. Wolf

Natashia Thewes

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

I’m a high school dropout and taught myself how to write.

 

How did you get into writing?

It was something to do on a night job I had.

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

Render Unto Caesar, 1984, and The Outsiders.

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

After I read Wool, by Hugh Howey.

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

Five months.

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

I have two screwdriver drinks to get the juices going.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

Very.

 

Do you read your book reviews?

Yep.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

Go to writers groups and keep writing.

 

What are you reading now?

Sickness in Hell, by Tarl Warwick.

 

What’s your next step?

Finishing my epic fantasy book and trying to get an agent with it.

 

 

Follow C. F. Wolf on Twitter @cfwolf6678

Paralysis – an interview with the author Michael Knapp

Hannah Jenkins

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I love to sing, and I’m kind of a karaoke fiend.

 

 

 

How did you get into writing?

 

I always read a lot as a child, but the first book that I remember really standing out to me as something different was “Cujo”, which I read at 8 or 9 years old. Ever since then, I have had a passion for both reading and writing. I let writing take a back seat while I was pursuing my culinary career, but it has stepped back into the forefront once again.

 

 

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

 

Only 3? Wow. That’s an incredibly difficult question for anyone that is always reading or listening to books. Off the top of my head, three books that I can always go back to are; Steinbeck, “Of Mice and Men”; Stephen King, “The Stand”; and Neil Gaiman, “American Gods”. “American Gods” is new to the list within the last year, but it was a quick addition to my list of favorites.

 

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

 

I’ve experienced sleep paralysis a number of times, and it never fails to be a terrifying and panic-inducing experience. I thought about what could happen if there was more to it than just the current medical definitions, and “Paralysis” began to take shape.

 

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

 

From the first three drafts, to editing, to final revisions, Paralysis continued to evolve, and the process took about 2 years.

 

 

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

 

I tend to write in silence, with the exception of my dog snoring next to me. I know that other writers enjoy music, but I have always been a lyrics and vocals fan, so I tend to get distracted too easily. When I’m first getting into the story, I aim for 1,000 words a day, every day. As I get further in, I push it to 1,500 to 2,000 words a day.

 

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

As an independent author with no real budget for advertising, marketing and social media are pretty much all that I have at my disposal to get my work out there. Getting your book in front of people that want to read it is one of the hardest parts of the process.

 

 

Do you read your book reviews?

 

I do, and it’s likely that I always will. If someone took the time to write a review, it means that they felt something strongly enough to put into words, good or bad.

 

 

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Don’t try to be your own editor. Edit to the best of your ability through at least two drafts and a polish, hand your polished work over to someone else for a professional edit, then edit again. Also, “On Writing” by Stephen King, is one of the best books on the subject that I have read.

 

 

What are you reading now?

 

I just finished “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running”, by Haruki Murakami, and have “Gwendy’s Button Box” by Stephen King and Richard Chizmar, along with “The Handmaid’s Tale”, by Margaret Atwood, in my bag for a trip over the next three days. I’m a fast reader.

 

What’s your next step?

 

I’ve started three additional stories at this point, and one has finally caught my full attention. I don’t know that I’ll ever be fortunate enough to file my taxes with “writer” as my sole occupation, but whatever else I do, I plan to tell more stories.

 

 

 

 

Follow Michael on Twitter @knappma78

An Interview with the Author Lynn Case

Hannah Jenkins

We caught up with Lynn Case, author of ‘Feathers in the Wind’ to find out where she got the idea for her new book and more…

 

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I was a Army wife and a truck driver, but I love to cook as well as write.

 

 

How did you get into writing?

 

.

I have been writing for as long as I can remember. I remember writing a mystery story when I was around 11 or 12. I would never share my writing with anyone until just a few years ago, when a cousin read Fears Revenge and pushed me to publish it.

 

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

 

 

Fears Revenge, Return to Lily Cove and Feathers in the Wind.

 

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

 

 

Well, I love a good mystery and I love the countryside and animals. So I put them all together in the latest book.

 

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

 

It takes me about a year to write a book and get it published. So far anyway. Each one has taken me a different amount of time.

 

 

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

 

I like to listen to music when I am writing. If I am writing a tense scene then I listen to 80’s hard rock . Gets the blood pumping . LOL

 

 

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

 

It’s very important. I enjoy writing, but marketing my work is difficult for me. I find it difficult to try and sell my works. I am my harshest critic.

 

 

Do you read your book reviews?

 

Unfortunately, yes I do read them. I can read a hundred reviews 88 good and one bad. That one bad one will always hurt and I question my work. So I probably shouldn’t read them, but I like to hear what readers have to say about my work.

 

 

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Write, just write. Even if it doesn’t make sense right now, just put your thoughts down on paper. One day it will all come together. Never give up on yourself. Never let someone else tell you that you’re not good enough. Write your stories for you. You can’t please everyone, so please yourself.

 

 

What are you reading now?

 

I am currently on a book tour so have no time to read. I don’t read when I am writing either. When I do find time to read, I like biographies or a good mystery.

 

 

What’s your next step?

 

Short term, finish up with this book tour later this year and then finish the 2 novels I have already started. Long term, get Fears Revenge made into a movie.

 

 

Follow Lynn on Twitter @Lynncasebooks

The Confessions of Jonathan Flite, an Interview with the Author Matthew J. Beier

BooksGoSocial

 

 

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I’m trying to build up the skills and bravery to go backpacking in the Sierra Nevada mountains solo and on a regular basis. I have all the gear, so I now need to bite the bullet do it. My only fear is that I wouldn’t know how to use my bear spray if I get attacked by a bear. (Knowing me, I’d probably spray it the wrong way, into my eyes.)

 

 

How did you get into writing?

 

I started dictating stories to my mother—beginning with my own little adaptations of “The Wizard of Oz” (movie)—when I was three or four, complete with drawn or painted pictures stapled into book form. I drew my first little comic strip at age six, then started writing my first stories and “screenplays” around age twelve. I didn’t get serious about writing until age seventeen or so, when I started developing the story that is now the Jonathan Flite series. It took me over a decade to figure out how to write it, so in the meantime, I wrote and published my first novel “The Breeders” in 2012, which was my initial foray into the book world.

 

 

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

 

Oh gosh. So many to choose from. I would say the Harry Potter series (cheating slightly to consider all seven books as one), “Never Let Me Go” by Kazuo Ishiguro, and “The Fabric of the Cosmos” by Brian Greene.

 

 

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

 

The Jonathan Flite series mashes a lot of topics together: life, death, ghosts, coming of age, science, murder, crime, religious terrorism, and questions about the nature of reality. Inspiration came from many places over the course of my life. I’ve always been curious about all the unanswered questions in the universe, so this series ultimately evolved into an examination of that overall topic. The story also involves seven kids who go missing, which is a result of both my sisters almost being kidnapped at different times when we were kids—something that still freaks me out if I really think about it. Finally, I grew up in a very religious household. This forced me later on in life to seriously examine the social ramifications of such organized thought structures. This process was unfortunately helped along by the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. That day influenced one of the major events that kicks off the Jonathan Flite series—that being a nuclear terrorist attack in Switzerland carried out by a fanatical Catholic. Because the books juggle multiple timelines and points of view, I’m able to explore these various subjects from a number of angles, which is a fun process.

 

 

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

 

As I mentioned, the overall series took about twelve years to develop before I finally figured out how to write it properly. I rewrote it at least ten times in different ways before finally stumbling upon a unique structural approach that I knew could work for all seven books.

 

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

 

Morning. Tea. Music. MacBook Air. It’s my favorite part of any day!

 

 

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

Marketing and social media are extremely important, and I plan to use these tools more as I publish further books in the series. You can have great reviews and a few sincere advocates dying to see your book on the bestseller lists, but it will never gain traction without marketing, promotion, and word of mouth.

 

 

 

Do you read your book reviews?

 

I do read book reviews, with special attention to negative ones, because A) I like to torture myself and B) I like to weigh other people’s opinions against my own vision. You can’t grow as a writer unless you’re able to take constructive criticism, so I use reviews as a tool to gauge my abilities and see how I might improve, or why I’m actually glad of the creative choices I’ve made. When the reviews are good, it also provides much-needed encouragement, because I was born in a cocoon of self doubt.

 

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Here’s my advice: Imagine how it felt to hold your favorite book in your hands for the first time, and how it felt to read those first few pages, all the way on to the last page. Then, imagine how you feel when looking at that book on your bookshelf, remembering how dazzling it was. If you’re aiming to write something equally dazzling, put your book in that book’s place. Imagine how it would feel to pick it up off a bookshelf and read that first page. Imagine how you would want to feel when closing the back cover. Then, get cracking. Take the necessary steps to make your imagined book a reality, and don’t stop until it’s exactly what you want it to be.

 

 

What are you reading now?

 

I’m currently reading all the new canon STAR WARS books for two reasons. First, I’m one of the biggest STAR WARS fans on Earth, and I care about that franchise as much as I care about my own books. Second, I would love to someday write new canon novels for Lucasfilm/Disney, and I want to keep up on their official storyline in case I ever get the chance.

 

 

What’s your next step?

I recently published Book 2 in the Jonathan Flite series, “The Release of Jonathan Flite,” so I’m now working on Book 3, “The Rise of Jonathan Flite,” while continuing to plan the last four books of the series. I’m also working on two screenplays, one short and one feature length. I’m hoping to direct them as my first two film projects within the next few years.

 

 

 

Follow Matthew on Twitter @MatthewBeier

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