Henry Albus and the Transformigation Watch – An interview with author Yahya Ashraf

Elisabeth Schaffalitzky

We had to opportunity to ask Yahya Ashraf, the author of Henry Albus and the Transformigation Watch, a few questions about himself and his writing.

 

Henry Albus and the Transformigation Watch by [Yahya Ashraf]

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I am an author

 

What novels affected you the most growing up?

 

Harry Potter

 

Where did the idea for your current book come from?

 

From my brain

 

Do you think there’s any way you could ever run out of ideas for books?

 

Never

 

What is your routine for writing and has this method changed over the span of your career?

 

There is no routine but I write whenever I get time

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

It is very important for my book as it is the key to a bestsellers

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Read books

 

What are you reading now?

 

Harry Potter

 

What’s your next step?

 

To write my next book

 

You can buy Henry Albus and the Transformigation Watch now through this link

 


 

Interested in getting your book promoted?  Have a look at http://yourbookpromoter.com

Plain Crazy – An interview with author Dani Jo Love

Elisabeth Schaffalitzky

We had time for a quick chat with Dani Jo Love, author of Plain Crazy, to find out a bit more about her and her new novel.

 

Plain Crazy by [Love, Dani Jo]

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

Here are a few things, I love whiskey. I’ve jumped out of a plane and I like driving fast… really fast.

 

What novels affected you the most growing up?

 

Lord of the Flies

 

Where did the idea for your current book come from?

 

After producing a reality show dealing with addictions, I was most fascinated by the housewives that are addicted to prescription drugs and what led them down that path.

 

Do you think there’s any way you could ever run out of ideas for books?

 

I don’t think so. There are myriad of experiences and I’m fascinated by the journey’s of others and how they overcome obstacles.

 

What is your routine for writing and has this method changed over the span of your career?

 

My routine is to write at 5am in the morning to whatever music that’s inspiring me at the time and I’ve been that way for decades. Especially during my scriptwriting years.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

In this day and age, I feel that as an indie-author, marketing and social media are a must for you and your audience to find each other.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Keep writing and be patient.

 

What are you reading now?

 

Apple Tree Yard by Louise Doughty

 

What’s your next step?

 

I’m writing the next book in the “Plain Crazy” series.

 

You can buy Dani Jo’s book Plain Crazy here

 


 

Interested in getting your book promoted?  Have a look at http://yourbookpromoter.com

Crown of Delusion – An interview with author Tanor Costa

Elisabeth Schaffalitzky

We got chatting with Tanor Costa, author of Crown of Delusion to find out more about him and his writing.

 

 

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I’ve done all of this at the young age of 19.

 

What novels affected you the most growing up?

 

Lord of the Rings, by far. Anything Middle Earth made me feel at home, adventurous, and most of all, happy.

 

Where did the idea for your current book come from?

 

I’ve had the initial idea since 12, I believe. I used to write as a child but was told it wasn’t a profession to pursue for one reason or another. Yet, here I am. I always wanted to do an adventure story with a grand cast of characters of different backgrounds, not species, just backgrounds. As I grew older, this single idea never left my head and branched out into a ton of different directions. It was finally last summer, I decided to write the damn book and I haven’t looked back since.

 

Do you think there’s any way you could ever run out of ideas for books?

 

I highly doubt it. I have 3 more books in my series including a spin-off as well as a few contemporaries. Even if ideas did falter, I created such a big world in my fantasy series that I could easily write more spin-offs, but only if I am truly passionate about the story.

 

What is your routine for writing and has this method changed over the span of your career?

 

I used to write in bulk. This made me take a lot of days off, which is taboo in the writing world but if I write, I can usually bang out 7,000-10,000 within 3 hours. In the start of my first novel, I wrote a chapter a day for 8 chapters. Each averaged about 6,000 words per chapter skewed by a short 3,000 word chapter. Now, I like to spread out my writing like short sprints. It helps with my prose, and I gained so much grammatical and prose knowledge throughout the first novel’s creation that whenever I write now, it’s much cleaner, which takes more time.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

Marketing is BEYOND important. Social media is honestly the best way to market something like a novel. If you don’t market your book, it probably won’t sell, in fact, it just won’t, because no one will know it exists. Marketing is my make or break, easily.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

I hear all the time about writers going back to their manuscripts and editing it countless amounts of times and then never doing anything with it because of fear, or something or other. My advice is simple: No one will buy a book if it’s not available to buy. Fight through the fear, enlist betas, an editor, proofreader, get feedback, boost your confidence and release the book. Writers are self conscious, that’s a fact. Even if you have to fake being brave to get it out there, do it. Don’t live with regrets regarding your stories, then you’ll never know if you could have done anything special.

 

What are you reading now?

 

Game of Thrones

 

What’s your next step?

 

Finish book 2 in my saga and market book 1 with all the ability I have.

 

You can buy Tanor’s Book, Crown of Delusion here

 


 

Interested in getting your book promoted?  Have a look at http://yourbookpromoter.com

Five Monkeys – An interview with Kieran Galvin

Elisabeth Schaffalitzky

We recently had the opportunity to have a chat with Kieran Galvin, author of Five Monkeys and ask him a little about his writing and his book ideas.

 

Five Monkeys: Gender Bending Suspense, Sex & Satire by [Galvin, Kieran]Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I’ve moved home more than 30 times and spent the last ten years in the Middle East. I also wrote and directed a movie ‘Puppy’ which was released in cinemas in New Zealand.

 

What novels affected you the most growing up?

 

The Odd Sea by Frederick Reiken, Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

 

Where did the idea for your current book come from?

 

While I was living in Melbourne, Australia, I met a transgender woman who had reverted to being a man and I found this fascinating. On top of all the psych-social-sexual questions it raised, he has also experienced some strange physical issues. I was fascinated. The main character in my book shares this trajectory but is otherwise completely fictional as I wanted to explore the character in my usual darkly funny way.

 

Do you think there’s any way you could ever run out of ideas for books?

 

Not so long as I have access to wine.

 

What is your routine for writing and has this method changed over the span of your career?

 

Long walks, lots of ‘down’ time, followed by very disciplined bursts of writing 10-14 hours a day for months at a time. I also like to work in coffee shops and usually incorporate some travel. My book ‘Five Monkeys’ was written in Barcelona, Budapest and Doha.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

It’s super important and very draining. I’ve been marketing mainstreams businesses for years so I prefer more measurable results-driven campaigns. I think social media is good for awareness but I’m not convinced it converts (profitably) to sales for writers. I see it more as a way of building a following for future books rather than driving sales for current books.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Be brave. Don’t be tempted to write genres that you don’t love. You know you’re writing is good when you experience the emotions of your characters first hand or when they say things that surprise you.

 

What are you reading now?

 

Rant by Chuck Palahniuk

 

What’s your next step?

 

Writing my next novel. Writing the screenplay version of Five Monkeys.

 

You can buy Kieran’s book Five Monkeys now here

 


 

 

Interested in getting your book promoted?  Have a look at http://yourbookpromoter.com

 

The Sweet Spot – and Interview with Joan Livingston

Elisabeth Schaffalitzky

We recently caught up with Joan Livingston, the author of The Sweet Spot, and asked her a few questions about herself and her writing.

 

The Sweet Spot by [Livingston, Joan]Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

When I was a newspaper reporter, I only had to use my press pass twice: interviewing President Bill Clinton’s National Security Adviser Tony Lake inside the White House; and at the local agricultural fair.

 

What novels affected you the most growing up?

 

I was moved by novels that had strong female characters such as those in To Kill a Mockingbird, The Secret Garden, and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.

 

Where did the idea for your current book come from?

 

Frankly, like all of my other novels, the idea for this one popped into my head and then I had my way with it. I often get my best ideas for characters and plot while I work in my garden, hike, drive, or just when I am about to fall asleep.

 

Do you think there’s any way you could ever run out of ideas for books?

Never. My only problem would be running out of time to write them.

 

What is your routine for writing and has this method changed over the span of your career?

 

When I worked full time as a newspaper editor, I got up at 5 a.m. to write before I headed to the newsroom. Since leaving that post, I still write early and then any time during the day that the spirit moves me.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

Marketing via social media has the potential to give writers, especially those who are self-published, the largest possible audience.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Write, rewrite, and read what others write.

 

What are you reading now?

 

I write a biweekly book review column called The Write Stuff for The Taos News in Taos, New Mexico, so I read a new book or more every week. I just finished Estelle Laure’s new YA novel But Then I Came Back.

 

What’s your next step?

 

The Sweet Spot is the first of my hilltown novels to be published. Currently, I am working on the next, a mystery. After losing her job as a newspaper editor, Isabel Long decides to solve a cold case involving a woman who went missing in her town 28 years ago. Her “Watson” is her 92-year-old mother. Yes, it is set in Conwell. I am on my second draft and expect to have it completed before the summer.

 

The Sweet Spot is available here

 

 


Interested in getting your book promoted?  Have a look at http://yourbookpromoter.com

 

 

 

 

 

Junkyard Druid – An Interview with MD Massey

Elisabeth Schaffalitzky

Today finds us chatting with MD Massey, the author of Junkyard Druid, Book 1 in the Colin McCool Paranormal Suspense Series!

 

TJunkyard Druid: A New Adult Urban Fantasy Novel (The Colin McCool Paranormal Suspense Series Book 1) by [Massey, M.D.]ell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I was a professional martial arts instructor for 20 years, and I still train several times a week. Currently I’m working on improving my ground fighting skills.

 

What novels affected you the most growing up?

 

Tolkien’s “The Hobbit” for one. That book introduced me to the world of fantasy fiction. I was also quite a fan of Terry Brooks’ novels as well.

 

Where did the idea for your current book come from?

 

I wanted to write about druids that were less Dungeons & Dragons and more like the druids of legend. While historical druids were priests and clerics, if you look at the druids in the Irish myths they spent a lot of their time acting as kingmakers and influencing major events. They were more like Gandalf or Allanon than the glorified eco-warriors you see depicted in most modern fantasy fiction.

 

Do you think there’s any way you could ever run out of ideas for books?

 

Never. Ideas are a dime a dozen. It’s executing on them that’s the real trick to being an author. I can come up with at least a handful of good novel ideas on any given day, but turning those ideas into compelling stories that feature believable characters who defy death time and again… that takes real skill. I don’t know if I’m there yet, but I’m working on it.

 

What is your routine for writing and has this method changed over the span of your career?

 

I get up around 5 am and grab a cup of coffee, then I warm-up my writing muscles for an hour or so by writing non-fiction content. Newsletters, blog posts, etc. Then I eat breakfast, shower, and start writing fiction, usually until noon or one. After that I take a break, and I might write again later in the day if I’m in the mood. But mornings are always the most productive time for me to write.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

Very. The only authors who sell books without much marketing are those breakout black swans you hear about occasionally; Weir, Howey, Hocking. But even they have to work to keep their books in front of readers.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Write. Most writers I see online spend all their time talking about writing and publishing. Then they wonder why they aren’t selling books. Well, you can’t sell what you don’t have. There aren’t a lot of hard and fast rules for success in this industry, except that you should always be writing your next novel. I think that’s the best advice any author can give or take.

 

What are you reading now?

 

“Appendix N: The Literary History of Dungeons & Dragons” by Jeffro Johnson, “Princess of Wands” by John Ringo (for the second time), and “Guerrilla Publishing” by Derek Murphy. But, Patricia Briggs’ next novel in the Mercy Thompson series releases soon, so I’ll probably drop everything when it hits my Kindle to read it straight through.

 

What’s your next step?

 

I’m currently writing the third book in the Colin McCool Paranormal Suspense series, “Moonlight Druid.” I’m going to finish the first tetralogy in that series with a fourth novel, then I’ll decide what to write after that. Probably more books about the Junkyard Druid, or a spin-off. It depends on what readers are asking for next.

 

Check out Junkyard Druid which is available here

 


Interested in getting your book promoted?  Have a look at http://yourbookpromoter.com

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