After Midnight – an interview with the author, A. Martin

Natashia Thewes

 

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

I’m normally meticulous, but when it comes to writing, the stories tell themselves. Whether I like it, or not!

 

How did you get into writing?
 

High School. Grade 11; but I always wrote little tales as a child. And it’s when I became a teen and found myself a little on the outside of any “click” or any interest at all; I delved into fiction head first like a meteorite cascading from the cosmos and plummeting back other worlds into the planets reading atmosphere. Bonzi!!!!!

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

The Journey Home, by Michael J. McCarthy, Off Season by Jack Ketchum, Bones by Stephen King. Lawdy… there’s just a couple more than that. But… you said three, didn’t you…

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

Well, I’ve written and was able to publish a bunch of short stories here and there in at-the-time popular fiction magazines and ezins; some of them became republished more than three or four times; they seemed that popular. So I kept a bunch (over twenty-six) I’d written, and; were either firstly rejected by magazines, or I just couldn’t find the right fit for the endings for, and re-wrote them… but managing to keep the heart of them; their themes. I figured, if I was to give readers the very best of me, THIS collection, would be it. And it will either be liked or hated, or ignored. But… every review it’s gotten so far, anywhere, even with Kirkus, has been no less than four to five stars. Knock on wood… I still got it!

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

About a year. And that what mainly finding and gathering stories I’d forgotten about on my PC, which many of them were only half written; had no ending, titles, even. Gathering a slew of those was daunting enough; never mind the fresh ones I’d gotten published just a month before starting this collection!

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

If I had it my way; writing full time, I would start at eight in the morning and end at noon, have lunch, take a nap, and start editing whatever I was working on at night until one or two in the morning… I love the whole process. But, I don’t write full time; mainly on the fly, most of the time… so really anytime, anywhere, is the right time, and place, when a story corners you and you have to get it done!

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

Very Important; as for any kind of platform, isn’t it’? Books, TV, Music… I know, even though I’m not traditionally published; if i don’t at least try to sell my work, getting out there in the world…. nobody would know my work really exists. And they SHOULD! I love this (bleep!), man… and if you do too, about your craft, you should give it the respect it deserves… Let people see it!

 

Do you read your book reviews?

Oh yeah… I think most writers do. If not every writer…It kinda lets you know where your strengths are, opposed to your weaknesses with your craft, and style of writing and storytelling. I even kept mental notes, and enjoyed the reviews from magazines about rejecting my short stories, or even a novel, for whatever reason… it didn’t matter why they had, it only mattered what I could learn from their advice, and where I could put my literary strengths into instead of just guessing all this time where should have been giving more attention on. Short stories? Or novels? Well… the Readers have voted. They always win, don’t they? But… together, we always do. Definitely a learning process.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

What advice could I possibly give that would secure their future goals, one by one? Every writer is different, and each one has their own way of working on their craft… it really depends what you would like to do WITH your craft. I know a writer who’d published over thirty short stories over one hundred times, but WON’T try any big commercial success. Nope. No novels or advertising for him; just sending stories out to every fiction magazine on the planet. It depends on what you’re comfortable with, I guess… I’ve found, as long as what you’re doing keeps YOU very happy… everything else is just an option. You’re literally-chamber is loaded, and ready… rest is up to you.

 

What are you reading now?

My own stories, so far, as I’m always onto something else after I publish…but, if not too busy, I like to enjoy five or six books a year. Of any length. Last year, I read seven…and out of all seven, Sidney Sheldon and Walter Mosely was my most favorite. Can’t get away from the masters after the first page… totally immersed in suspenseful glory.

 

What’s your next step?

Working on something else; what else is there? As long as readers keep wanting more, I’ll try to keep feeding their hunger for my work. If they have any; it’ll show with any book I decide to publish out into the world. I’d always have a reason to strive further, push harder with my craft that way. Readers sure can keep you on your toes, and that’s what I really look for. It helps me keeping on.

 

Follow A. Martin on Twitter @AMartinPress

 

MC: Knight: Book One – an interview with the author, L. Ann Marie

Natashia Thewes

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

I don’t read the genre I write in. I’m a horror, sci-fyish reader. King and Rice are favorites.

 

How did you get into writing?

I needed a job. At the time, I was a graphic designer for an ad agency. My bosses were crazy. Stories filling my head kept me busy while doing the mind numbing political propaganda art. I started writing the stories down and published them on Smashwords. Once I started, I couldn’t stop. I fell in love with the process, characters and job. And it is a job now.

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

IT, Angela’s Ashes and Queen of the Damned

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

The news. My books are about people working together for a greater good. Overcoming horrific situations to make it to happy, then turn around and put their hands out for the person behind them. Whether it’s domestic abuse, homelessness or PTSD. We all have something; we all need a hand. The news shows us every day that there is a need. In my stories, I supply the hand.

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

I have written 25 books. Most take a month to a month and a half. The characters and stories connect making background easy.

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

The characters play in my head. I write until they stop. No rituals, no outlines.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

Very, that’s how I started. I was picked up by a publisher very early on, but they have since closed. I don’t know the ‘how’ to market so other people have that job.

 

Do you read your book reviews?

Yes. When I first started, I would write down their points like it was advice. Now I like them in Amazon, about once a month, for the rating.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

Keep writing. Always move forward and accept help if it’s offered.

 

What are you reading now?

Mr. Mercedes by King

 

What’s your next step?

I’m finishing the Protectors Series and have a character that is trying to get some attention. I think I’ll give it to him. A new place, new characters to work with and new job to explore sounds fun.

 

 

I’m Not Dead – an interview with the author, William A Thau

Natashia Thewes

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

As an attorney in a 700 lawyer firm, I represented many high profile clients, including the Dallas Cowboys. I also represented the first Savings and Loan crook sentenced to Federal prison, and spent days being interviewed by Federal prosecutors and the FBI.

How did you get into writing?

I was head of fifty lawyers who represented banks and savings and loans in 1990, all of whom (everyone) went into receivership – almost 200. A counselor suggested I write a book about it to help me out of my depression. I wrote Non-Recourse, a thriller novel.

What are your top 3 books of all time?

Paradise by Judith McNaught, The Sandler Inquiry and The Eye of the Needle by Ken Follet.

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

It just came to me – implausible as it may initially seem, it’s based entirely on real fact.

How long did it take you to write this book?

One and a half years.

Have you got any writing rituals?

No

How important is marketing and social media for you?

I don’t know. I’ve tried a number of publicists and self-promotions with little success.

Do you read your book reviews?

Yes. There aren’t many.

What advice would you have for other writers?

Write for your own pleasure, not with the expectation of becoming a best-selling author.

What are you reading now?

Nothing.

The Five Roads: Part 1 – an interview with the author C. F. Wolf

Natashia Thewes

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

I’m a high school dropout and taught myself how to write.

 

How did you get into writing?

It was something to do on a night job I had.

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

Render Unto Caesar, 1984, and The Outsiders.

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

After I read Wool, by Hugh Howey.

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

Five months.

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

I have two screwdriver drinks to get the juices going.

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

Very.

 

Do you read your book reviews?

Yep.

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

Go to writers groups and keep writing.

 

What are you reading now?

Sickness in Hell, by Tarl Warwick.

 

What’s your next step?

Finishing my epic fantasy book and trying to get an agent with it.

 

 

Follow C. F. Wolf on Twitter @cfwolf6678

Paralysis – an interview with the author Michael Knapp

Hannah Jenkins

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I love to sing, and I’m kind of a karaoke fiend.

 

 

 

How did you get into writing?

 

I always read a lot as a child, but the first book that I remember really standing out to me as something different was “Cujo”, which I read at 8 or 9 years old. Ever since then, I have had a passion for both reading and writing. I let writing take a back seat while I was pursuing my culinary career, but it has stepped back into the forefront once again.

 

 

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

 

Only 3? Wow. That’s an incredibly difficult question for anyone that is always reading or listening to books. Off the top of my head, three books that I can always go back to are; Steinbeck, “Of Mice and Men”; Stephen King, “The Stand”; and Neil Gaiman, “American Gods”. “American Gods” is new to the list within the last year, but it was a quick addition to my list of favorites.

 

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

 

I’ve experienced sleep paralysis a number of times, and it never fails to be a terrifying and panic-inducing experience. I thought about what could happen if there was more to it than just the current medical definitions, and “Paralysis” began to take shape.

 

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

 

From the first three drafts, to editing, to final revisions, Paralysis continued to evolve, and the process took about 2 years.

 

 

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

 

I tend to write in silence, with the exception of my dog snoring next to me. I know that other writers enjoy music, but I have always been a lyrics and vocals fan, so I tend to get distracted too easily. When I’m first getting into the story, I aim for 1,000 words a day, every day. As I get further in, I push it to 1,500 to 2,000 words a day.

 

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

As an independent author with no real budget for advertising, marketing and social media are pretty much all that I have at my disposal to get my work out there. Getting your book in front of people that want to read it is one of the hardest parts of the process.

 

 

Do you read your book reviews?

 

I do, and it’s likely that I always will. If someone took the time to write a review, it means that they felt something strongly enough to put into words, good or bad.

 

 

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Don’t try to be your own editor. Edit to the best of your ability through at least two drafts and a polish, hand your polished work over to someone else for a professional edit, then edit again. Also, “On Writing” by Stephen King, is one of the best books on the subject that I have read.

 

 

What are you reading now?

 

I just finished “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running”, by Haruki Murakami, and have “Gwendy’s Button Box” by Stephen King and Richard Chizmar, along with “The Handmaid’s Tale”, by Margaret Atwood, in my bag for a trip over the next three days. I’m a fast reader.

 

What’s your next step?

 

I’ve started three additional stories at this point, and one has finally caught my full attention. I don’t know that I’ll ever be fortunate enough to file my taxes with “writer” as my sole occupation, but whatever else I do, I plan to tell more stories.

 

 

 

 

Follow Michael on Twitter @knappma78

An Interview with the Author Lynn Case

Hannah Jenkins

We caught up with Lynn Case, author of ‘Feathers in the Wind’ to find out where she got the idea for her new book and more…

 

Tell us something unexpected about yourself!

 

I was a Army wife and a truck driver, but I love to cook as well as write.

 

 

How did you get into writing?

 

.

I have been writing for as long as I can remember. I remember writing a mystery story when I was around 11 or 12. I would never share my writing with anyone until just a few years ago, when a cousin read Fears Revenge and pushed me to publish it.

 

 

What are your top 3 books of all time?

 

 

Fears Revenge, Return to Lily Cove and Feathers in the Wind.

 

 

Where did you get the inspiration for your current book?

 

 

Well, I love a good mystery and I love the countryside and animals. So I put them all together in the latest book.

 

 

How long did it take you to write this book?

 

It takes me about a year to write a book and get it published. So far anyway. Each one has taken me a different amount of time.

 

 

 

Have you got any writing rituals?

 

I like to listen to music when I am writing. If I am writing a tense scene then I listen to 80’s hard rock . Gets the blood pumping . LOL

 

 

 

How important is marketing and social media for you?

 

 

It’s very important. I enjoy writing, but marketing my work is difficult for me. I find it difficult to try and sell my works. I am my harshest critic.

 

 

Do you read your book reviews?

 

Unfortunately, yes I do read them. I can read a hundred reviews 88 good and one bad. That one bad one will always hurt and I question my work. So I probably shouldn’t read them, but I like to hear what readers have to say about my work.

 

 

 

What advice would you have for other writers?

 

Write, just write. Even if it doesn’t make sense right now, just put your thoughts down on paper. One day it will all come together. Never give up on yourself. Never let someone else tell you that you’re not good enough. Write your stories for you. You can’t please everyone, so please yourself.

 

 

What are you reading now?

 

I am currently on a book tour so have no time to read. I don’t read when I am writing either. When I do find time to read, I like biographies or a good mystery.

 

 

What’s your next step?

 

Short term, finish up with this book tour later this year and then finish the 2 novels I have already started. Long term, get Fears Revenge made into a movie.

 

 

Follow Lynn on Twitter @Lynncasebooks

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